Have a preschooler? Play word games at the super market.

Parent Message #9 of 13 from my book, “Make Time for Reading: a story guide for parents of babies and young children” …

Did you know that preschoolers who can distinguish the ‘little’ sounds in words often do better when they learn to read?  That’s why rhyming and word play are so important.

But to make these activities also FUN, sit your preschooler in a shopping cart and use the food market as a learning lab! Say egg-plant. Say it again, but don’t say EGG…. Say banana. Say it again, but don’t say BA. Say kiwi. Say it again, but don’t say WI. While you’re at it,  you will not only strengthen your child’s pre-reading skills, you will be teaching your child interesting new words.

For more details about word games, search http://www.getreadytoread.org for my 8 minute film, Raising Readers.   BLOG page 9

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#8 of 13 Parent Messages from my book, “Make Time for Reading” available only at www.readingfarm.net


OUR CHILDREN IMITATE AND WANT TO BE LIKE THOSE THEY LOVE. SHARING THE ACT OF READING BRINGS PARENTS AND CHILDREN CLOSER EVEN AS CHILDREN BEGIN TO READ ON THEIR OWN. SHOW THEM THAT YOU READ — YOUR NOVELS, YOUR RECIPES, THE DIRECTIONS FOR THE NEW APPLIANCE … EXAMPLE IS A POWERFUL TEACHER.

jeanevaread1

The Rapidly Growing Number of Hispanic children

In California and New Mexico the number of preschool-age Hispanic children is growing so fast, they outnumber their non-Hispanic counterparts.

When supported in becoming bilingual, these children acquire a ‘brain flexibility’ that comes from shifting from language 1 to language 2 and back again and again.

That’s why I translated my book, “Make Time for Reading” into Spanish, with the help of Rosa Benavides a former Massachusetts, elementary school teacher. My bottom line message to parents is this: teach your children about letters, sounds and books before they begin school. Children learn more … inside of their most important relationships.

Hispanic children will grow up to become workers and voters. I’d like to do my part in helping them build a strong foundation for reading in both Spanish and English.

#7 of 13 parent messages from my book, “Make Time for Reading” available at www.readingfarm.net

TODDLERS  =  ON THE MOVE!

Some toddlers are not interested in sitting, listening and looking at a book. So wait until nap time or bed time when you see their little eye lids begin to droop, and read softly,  soothingly. Keep reading for a minute more even after they have fallen asleep. 

Read to them while they are in their high chair eating even if you think they are not listening. In this way, you are also feeding them new words and ideas.

Most of all, be patient and and don’t miss a day of reading.

The pay-off is huge!

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# 6 of 13 parent messages from my book, “Make Time for Reading” available on www.readingfarm.net

How early should children own their own books? I say early toddlerhood….especially if they are given their very own book shelf or book-basket that’s easy for them to reach. And just like their favorite toy, bring books along whenever you know there will be some waiting time, in a restaurant, an airport, bus or train terminal. You can never have too many books – so give them and ask for them for birthday and holiday presents!

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Page #5 of 13 Parent Messages from my book: “Make Time for Reading” available on www.readingfarm.net

Our children experience a growth spurt in self-expression between the ages of 1 and 4. They thrive in language and reading-rich  environments. So make sure the people who take care of your baby make reading and talking important!

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#4 of 13 Parent Messages to Help Build the Foundational Skills for Reading

 This is page 4 of my book,

Make Time for Reading- a Story Guide for Parents of Babies and Young Children                           available at http://www.readingfarm.net.

Sometimes as parents we are just too tired to read every, single night.

So what’s a great alternative?

Tell your child stories! Stories build closeness and an appreciation for family traditions and memories  ….especially funny stories you might tell about yourself as a child.

OR ….

check out books-without-words from your children’s library. Then you can make up the story as you go… with help of course from your little one.

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